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The Donation Process

The Donation Process

From Tragedy to Triumph

Following organ, cornea and/or tissue recovery, depending on the circumstances of the death, the body is released to the coroner/medical examiner or to the funeral home of the family's choice.

Eligibility

To be eligible for organ donation, an individual must be declared brain dead and maintained on a ventilator. In special circumstances, organ donation may be possible following cardiac death. Cornea and tissue donation, on the other hand, take place after either brain death or cardiac death, and ventilator maintenance is not necessary.

Recovery

The recovery of organs is conducted in an operating room under the direction of qualified surgeons, and tissue recoveries are performed in qualified rooms using the strictest rules to minimize infection. An open-casket funeral is possible.

Following organ, cornea and/or tissue recovery, depending on the circumstances of the death, the body is released to the coroner/medical examiner or to the funeral home of the family's choice.

Recipient Determination

Organs are matched to recipients through the United Network of Organ Sharing based on body size, blood type, medical urgency and geographic location as it relates to travel time.

When it comes to saving lives, the allocation process does not discriminate on account of race, gender, age, income or any other factor.

Confidentiality

Names and location of the organ and/or tissue recipients are kept confidential, and the identity of the donor is not revealed to the recipients.